The coronavirus ban on elective surgeries might show us many people can avoid going under the knife

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❇️ many elective procedures are done for conditions that can improve without surgery.
❇️ “In all recent studies where researchers have tested common elective orthopaedic surgical procedures against a placebo (just an incision, for example), the improvement in symptoms has been quite good, regardless of whether or not participants had the surgery or the placebo.”
❇️ “These procedures include spine fusions and decompressions for back and leg pain, carpal tunnel decompression, arthroscopic surgery for shoulder and knee pain, and joint replacement surgery.”
❇️ “We found only 14% of the studies showed surgery was clearly better than not doing the surgery. In most studies it was a toss-up, or the patients who had surgery fared worse.”

#Overutilization_of_Surgery

#Knee

https://theconversation.com/the-coronavirus-ban-on-elective…

The coronavirus ban on elective surgeries might show us many people can avoid going under the knife

Last month, Australia announced a pause on all elective surgeries. This could have mixed effects now and in the longer term.

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Posted to FB on 2020-04-24 07:24:40

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